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Have you ever noticed the taste of your own cooking becoming too familiar?  It happens to me often. I first noticed it when Bogdan made butter chicken one night in late winter this year. We were in the middle of our first whole30 and experimenting with making different recipes compliant. One of our favourites was butter chicken with coconut milk instead of dairy and riced cauliflower instead of basmati. I made it quite often. It was a quick, warming, stick-to-your-ribs meal perfect for cold February weeknights. I don’t remember why but that particular night Bogdan decided he would make it. Bogdan can cook, he just doesn’t do it very often so I wasn’t expecting the level of flavour development he achieved in his 30 minute stint in the kitchen. When I took the first bite I was blown away by the flavours.The dish was bright, fragrant, and captivating. I ate, quietly mesmerized. I couldn’t figure out how he had made a familiar dish so exciting. It was like a jolt. A reawakening. A reminder of why I do what I do. Why food is at the centre of it all.

That experience made me realize that when one cooks, they leave a signature that makes the food their own. That probably sound obvious but even so it’s definitely taken for granted. It has little to do with following recipes and everything to do with personal style. That’s why nothing will ever taste like mom’s cooking. It’s the same reason my own cooking often starts becoming too familiar. I know my own cooking. I know my own methods and can usually anticipate how something will taste. That’s why I was so floored when I tasted these curried carrot and quinoa cakes. For a recipe I came up with to make use of juicer pulp (after making carrot juice gajar halwa gummies) these were phenomenal.

Knowing every step and ingredient can take some of the magic out of that first bite but that was definitely not the case here. These cakes have a perfect crisp crust enveloping the mouth-watering interplay of herbs and spices in an unexpectedly meaty filling. Writing this is making me want to make them again tonight. As I told Bogdan last night through mouthfuls of carrot and quinoa “I would juice just to make these.” On that note, I did use juicer pulp to make them and I know some people might not have juicers. I haven’t tried it but I think you could replicate this effect if you grated carrot and then squeezed out the liquid with some cheesecloth.

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It’s a lot of work but I would do it for these cakes. They’re that good. Again, I haven’t tried it so this isn’t a recommendation but if you really want to have them then this might be a good way.

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Ingredients

2.5 cups / 600 mL carrot pulp
3 eggs, lightly beaten
2 cups cooked quinoa
1/4 cup finely diced red onion
1/4 cup diced cilantro
3 cloves of garlic (mashed)
1 cm x 1cm cube of ginger (mashed)
1 TBSP curry powder
2 tsp garam masala
2 tsp salt
½ tsp cumin
½ tsp coriander
½ tsp turmeric
¼ tsp cardamom
pinch of cinnamon
5 TBSP ghee for frying

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Method

Mix all ingredients in a bowl until well combined.
Form mix into either large (burger sized) or smaller falafel sized patties.
Heat ghee in a non-stick pan on medium heat.
Once heated, place patties in pan without crowding. Fry on medium heat uncovered for 5-7 minutes. The idea is to form a crust on the bottom. If the heat is too high they’ll burn instead of crisping.
Once a crust has formed (you can usually tell if they’re easier to pick up with a spatula) then flip and cook on the next side for another 5-7 minutes.
Best served hot with a spicy raita.

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Also for anyone wondering, the chilies in the pictures aren’t in the actual recipe (though you could add them if you wanted to) they were used in the raita I made to go with the cakes. I’ll try to get that recipe posted soon too.

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Author

My name is Cristina. I was born in Constanta, Romania and moved to Toronto with my parents aged five. Growing up I spent every summer at my grandparents homestead in rural Romania, which instilled in me a deep and consuming love for traditional culture. Back in Toronto I made friends from every part of the world, which sparked a longstanding love affair with the complex identities and traditions behind the cultures I encounter.

For the last three years I’ve been getting to know American culture living in Royal Oak, Michigan with my Romanian-Canadian husband Bogdan and our American rescue dog Oliver.

Culture and identity has been a defining part of my life and I love sharing my explorations in food and culture here. I also write about managing my multiethnic foodie kitchen, sourcing good ingredients, and travel.

If you want to connect the best place to find me is Instagram (I’m always online :P)

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